If are experiencing long delays in the hiring process, you are not alone, many job seekers wait with you. The average time to fill a job from the initial posting to an accepted offer increased by 62% for large global organizations between 2010 and 2015, according to research from CEB, a management and technology consulting firm. Why are companies taking so long to hire? Unfortunately, there is no one specific reason, but rather it is likely a combination of factors.

More screening tools- Glassdoor conducted a study of 344,250 interview reviews in six countries submitted anonymously to examine what is happening from a jobseeker’s point of view. According to the study, employers are increasingly using more screening methods. Here are some examples of the increases between 2010 and 2014:
•Background checks rose from 25% to 42%
•Skills tests increased from 16% to 23%
•Drug tests from 13% to 23%
•Personality tests went from 12% to 18%

Glassdoor reports that each of the screens adds a statistically significant amount to average time required for the interview process, and in some cases, adding a full week.

More panel interviews- Organizations are adopting a more consensus-driven decision process that takes more time. “Everyone feels they need to give their opinion on the candidate,” says Danielle Wienblatt co-founder and CEO of Take The Interview in a recent interview with HR Magazine. Wienblatt reveals that “sometimes a company has 30 rounds of interviews”.

Company Size Matters-Jobs stay open longest at large companies. The Glassdoor Economic Research report found the following:
•At companies from 10-49 employees, hiring took on average of 15 days
•At companies from 50-249 employees, hiring took on average of just under 20 days
•At companies from 250-999 employees, hiring takes on average 22 days
•At companies with 1,000-9,999 employees, hiring takes on average 26 days

The report drew two conclusions from the data. First, larger corporations hire more specialized and technical employees requiring more screening. Second, large companies have more bureaucracy of approvals and decisions which causes slowing of the hiring process.

Industries Matter- The types of jobs that employers are hiring affect the duration of job openings. Typically government employers including local, state, and federal agencies hire most slowly. At the opposite side of the spectrum are franchise employers which have the shortest hiring cycle. Franchise employers include many retail and fast food establishments. The higher level of skill required to do the job, the longer and more intensive the screening process is. Some comparisons from the report are:
•Government employers take on average 60 days to hire
•College/University and hospital employers take on average just over 30 days to hire
•Franchise employers take on average just over 10 days to hire

Location Matters- Where the job is located also seems to affect the duration of the hiring process. Cities often have cluster of industries. For example, Washington D.C. has a large cluster of government employers, and Silicon Valley has a large number of tech employers. Miami, Phoenix, and Orlando have large hospitality industries. Here is a comparison for times to hire:
•Washington D.C.: an average of 34.4 days
•San Jose: an average of 24.8 days
•San Francisco: an average of 23.7 days
•Orlando: an average of 19.3 days
•Phoenix: an average of 19.1 days
•Miami: an average of 18.6 days

Titles Matter- The more complex a job is, the longer the hiring process is. The reported job titles taking the most time are government, academic, and senior level executive positions. The shortest interview processes are found among more routine jobs. Here are the Glassdoor report numbers:
•Police officer takes on average 127.6 days to hire
•Assistant Professor takes on average 58.7 days to hire
•Senior Vice President takes on average 55.5 days to hire
•Managing Director takes on average 51.1 days to hire
•Line cook takes on average 7 days to hire
•Server/Bartender takes on average 5.7 days to hire

Recruiting of Passive Candidates-Social media has transformed recruiting by making it easier to contact candidates that are not actively looking for a job. Organizations are using LinkedIn and other social media to woo people to work for them but there are some disadvantages. “The recruiting process takes longer, and the conversion ratio is lower for candidates who are not actively seeking a new job” says Steven Davis, an economics professor at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business when interviewed by HR Magazine.

If you are currently seeking a new job, you have most likely experienced the long wait time for a decision to be made. Unfortunately, it appears that the time may even be getting longer given the trend in hiring. The key is to not get discouraged. Keep in mind what your mother has taught you- “Good things come to those who wait”.

Stacy Harshman, founder of Your Fulfilling Life, brings her experience as a recruiter for a Fortune 500 corporation to her work as a career coach. In addition to helping people discover their passions, she also provides clients with insight into the mind of a recruiter, unlocking the secrets of what employers look for in potential employees. Stacy offers individual and group coaching in person and by phone to those seeking positive change in their professional lives.
Get your free audio of Four Essential Steps For A Successful Career Change on http://www.YourFulfillinglife.com

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Job interviewEver heard the word “returnship”? Returnship is an internship opportunity geared towards experienced professionals. The concept was coined by Goldman Sachs back in 2008 to help people restart their careers after an extended absence from the workforce. Goldman began a program to offer a paid, ten-week program for professionals to experience working again and at the end, offered full-time jobs to those selected. This program is still in existence and as a result, other companies such as Capital One, have followed its lead.

What are the benefits? A returnship is a way to transition back into the workplace. According to Goldman Sach’s website: “Whether it leads to a full-time career, or serves to sharpen the skills necessary to take the next step, the Goldman Sachs Returnship Program is a valuable experience for anyone who’s ready to re-enter the workforce.” Stacey Delo, founder and CEO of Maybrooks, a career resource for mothers says “a returnship is a great way to get some experience and leverage that into a job”.

What are the risks involved? A returnship may sound like a great option but there are definitely drawbacks you must consider. Stacey Hawley, a published author, and career counselor, advises you not to try it. She writes “A returnship is NOT an internship. And individuals pursuing a returnship are VERY different than individuals pursuing an internship. Interns are usually college students who only WANT to work for 10 weeks. Individuals who are considering a returnship really want to work full time. “ Hawley also reveals that Goldman Sachs hires only 50% of its returnship participants. She warns “if you aren’t hired full-time after the trial period is over, you need to start all over again. And explain to a new employer why you weren’t offered a full-time job.”

If you are considering a returnship, think about the benefits vs. rewards. You may be able to land a full time position at the organization; but it is probably a 50-50 chance. You will likely be able to add some skills to your resume but you could also accomplish that by working for a temporary staffing firm. Also, not all companies pay their returnship participates so evaluate if the experience is worth giving up your pay and time lost in job search activities. Overall, although a returnship may be wonderful for some participants, it is most likely not the best option for the majority of job seekers.

Stacy Harshman, founder of Your Fulfilling Life, brings her experience as a recruiter for a Fortune 500 corporation to her work as a career coach. In addition to helping people discover their passions, she also provides clients with insight into the mind of a recruiter, unlocking the secrets of what employers look for in potential employees. Stacy offers individual and group coaching in person and by phone to those seeking positive change in their professional lives.
Get your free audio of Four Essential Steps For A Successful Career Change on www.YourFulfillingLife.com

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tablet pcThe healthcare industry is on track to create 5.6 million new jobs by 2020, according to a study from Georgetown University’s Center on Education and Workforce. Healthcare is now responsible for one in nine jobs in the U.S. according to the Labor Department. In addition to traditional doctors and nurses, there will also be demand for other positions that support the healthcare industry.

Not all healthcare jobs require degrees- Below are healthcare positions that may require education such as certification, but do not require a degree.

Medical Records and Health Information Technicians- Processes, maintains, compiles, and reports patient information for health requirements and standards. Median salary- $17.26 hourly, $35,900 annual

Medical Secretary- Duties may include scheduling appointments, billing patients, and compiling and recording medical charts, reports, and correspondence. Median salary- $15.50 hourly, $32,240 annual

Phlebotomist- Draws blood for tests, transfusions, donations, or research. Median salary- $14.74 hourly, $30,670 annual

Medical assistant- Performs duties assisting a physician such as taking and recording vital signs and medical histories, preparing patients for examination, drawing blood, and administering medications. Median salary- $14.41 hourly, $29,960 annual

Pharmacy Technician- Prepares medications under the direction of a pharmacist. Median salary- $14.33 hourly, $29,810 annual

Nursing assistant- Provides basic patient care such as feeding, bathing, dressing, grooming, or moving patients, or changing linens. Median salary- $12.07 hourly, $25,100 annual

Home health and hospice aides- Provides routine individualized healthcare such as changing bandages and dressing wounds, at the patient’s home or in a care facility. Median wage- $10.28 hourly, $21,380 annual

A job in healthcare can be rewarding. As the ancient Roman philosopher Cicero said, “In nothing do men more nearly approach the gods than in giving health to men.

Stacy Harshman, founder of Your Fulfilling Life, brings her experience as a recruiter for a Fortune 500 corporation to her work as a career coach. In addition to helping people discover their passions, she also provides clients with insight into the mind of a recruiter, unlocking the secrets of what employers look for in potential employees. Stacy offers individual and group coaching in person and by phone to those seeking positive change in their professional lives.
Get your free audio of Four Essential Steps For A Successful Career Change on http://www.YourFulfillinglife.com

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concentrated scowling young woman looking through magnifyierRecently, Jobvite, a recruiting intelligence platform, surveyed 1,404 recruiting and HR professionals from a range of industries on how talent is sourced and what current trends are being seen in the labor market. The survey, conducted in July 2015, reveals how recruiters find candidates, what stumbling blocks they encounter, what they notice most, and how they evaluate candidates. Additionally, the survey included advice on how to best utilize social media.

The top recruiting sources- Referrals still remain the #1 source of all hires at 78%. Social and professional networks represent 56% of hires and intern-to-hire programs come in at 55%. Although it is very tempting to spend the majority of your job search time applying for online positions, it is clear from this data that building relationships is a much more effective method to landing a job.

Stumbling Blocks- Internal bottlenecks appear to have a big impact on the time it takes to hire a candidate. Recruiters reported that the biggest challenge (49%) is the amount of time that a hiring manager takes to move a candidate through the recruiting process. The next biggest challenge (41%) is the time it takes for a hiring manager to review resumes. Salary negotiations hold up the process 19% of the time. Although recruiters are the ones that you most often interact with as an applicant, it appears that the hiring managers are the ones responsible for the extended process.

What recruiters notice most- The #1 thing that recruiters consider most on an online profile is the length of job tenure (74%) followed by the length of tenure with your current employer (57%). Other important considerations are mutual connections (34%), commitment to professional organizations (30%), and examples of written or design work (29%).

Evaluating Candidates- Most organizations still rely on resumes and in-person interviews to evaluate candidates. What really matters most is culture fit (88%), previous job experience (87%), and characteristics such as enthusiasm (87%), industry knowledge (85%), conversation skills (79%), punctuality (66%), and appearance (63%).

Advice for Social Media- A full 76% of recruiters recommend job seekers share details about volunteer, professional, or social engagement work. Spelling and grammar mistakes are noticed by 72% of respondents. Half of the recruiters (52%) suggest that you engage with current events appropriately. On the negative side, 75% view talking about marijuana use as inappropriate and 54% view alcohol use as a drawback. If you are looking for a job in communications or marketing, be sure to engage in social media because 33% of recruiters in this industry view limited engagement as a negative.

With social media, job search has become a little more complicated; however, it still boils down to the same basic principles- engage with your network, have patience in the process, and present yourself as an enthusiastic, well-informed individual.

Stacy Harshman, founder of Your Fulfilling Life, brings her experience as a recruiter for a Fortune 500 corporation to her work as a career coach. In addition to helping people discover their passions, she also provides clients with insight into the mind of a recruiter, unlocking the secrets of what employers look for in potential employees. Stacy offers individual and group coaching in person and by phone to those seeking positive change in their professional lives.

Get your free audio of Four Essential Steps For A Successful Career Change on http://www.YourFulfillingLife.com

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 Ever wished you could reinvent your life or your career? Apparently this desire is quite common. Social psychologist Richard Luker says that “adults are saying not only do I see a more vigorous life, I’m up for it, I’m game, I want to do more. Our research is bearing that out in spades”. Jane Pauley in her book Your Life Calling: Reimagining the Rest of Your Life, states “Today men and women in their forties can reasonably be thinking about beginning a new career or something new that’s not a career. We are the first generation to get a heads-up that not only is there more to come, but may even the best of all.”

Put up your periscope– Knowing where to begin to reinvent your career is challenging to say the least. For her book, Pauley interviewed Tripp Hanson who reinvented his career from being a Broadway performer to becoming an acupuncturist. Hanson was 42 when he began to question what his next career move would be. He says “Forty did not feel like thirty at the end of the show. More ice, more heat, more Advil”. Hanson sought out a therapist who advised him to “Put up your periscope. Just look around, over the fence, over the hedge, check it out. Things are going to grab your attention; pay attention when they do. When something intrigues you, pay attention. Why does that matter so much to you? Go a little further. Take another step. Listen to that small, quiet voice.“

Tripp Hanson did indeed ‘put up his periscope.’ He became intrigued with acupuncture after taking his dog Spanky, for knee problems. When Spanky could walk down stairs within 2 visits, Hanson decided to also try acupuncture for his own injuries. He too experienced immediate results. He found that acupuncture not only intrigued him, but it was also a re-awakening of a childhood dream of becoming a doctor.

The first step- Reinventing your career is often a long process, but the first step can be straight forward. It can be as simple as noticing what captures your interest. If you enjoy journaling, you can begin by writing about the things you would enjoy learning more about. If you are not a writer, consider taking photos of scenes that draw you in. Yet another idea is to create a Pinterest board of things you like best. It doesn’t matter what method you use, the important thing is that you notice and take note of what intrigues you.

If you are thinking there is something more for you to do, you are on the right track. Jane Pauley concludes her book by saying “Inspiration is everywhere, but you have to be looking.” I would also add ‘you also need to be listening to hear that small quiet voice of inner wisdom.’

Stacy Harshman, founder of Your Fulfilling Life, brings her experience as a recruiter for a Fortune 500 corporation to her work as a career coach. In addition to helping people discover their passions, she also provides clients with insight into the mind of a recruiter, unlocking the secrets of what employers look for in potential employees. Stacy offers individual and group coaching in person and by phone to those seeking positive change in their professional lives.

Get your free audio of Four Essential Steps For A Successful Career Change on http://www.YourFulfillingLife.com

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young businessman in front of a crossroadMost people assume if you want to change careers, you should start by deciding what your new profession will be, but that is not the first step according to Harvard business school professor Herminia Ibarra. She writes, “By far the biggest mistake people make when trying to change careers is to delay taking the first step until they have settled on a destination.” In other words, not knowing the end result should not be a barrier to action.

Change makes ready- Ibarra encourages people to start the change process before they have all the answers worked out. “What people get wrong about reinvention is that they think they have to be ready. Instead change makes ready”. In short, seeing small changes prepares us for even bigger changes to occur.

Do first, know later– To change careers, you must step out of your comfort zone and begin doing something. It is like learning a new game. You wouldn’t say, “I have to know exactly what the end result will be before I begin”. You simply start with the first step and learn as you go.

If you are thinking about changing careers, don’t delay. Take a first step. Change makes ready. As author Job Sabah says “You don’t have to be great to start, but you have to start to be great.”

Stacy Harshman, founder of Your Fulfilling Life, brings her experience as a recruiter for a Fortune 500 corporation to her work as a career coach. In addition to helping people discover their passions, she also provides clients with insight into the mind of a recruiter, unlocking the secrets of what employers look for in potential employees. Stacy offers individual and group coaching in person and by phone to those seeking positive change in their professional lives.
Get your free audio of Four Essential Steps For A Successful Career Change on http://www.YourFulfillingLife.com

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 The best job leads are likely to come from your network of connections; however, asking them for help can seem daunting. We often procrastinate about informing our network because it can be a bit awkward. Below are some ideas of how to talk with your contacts.

1. Know what you are looking for- Job seekers are often unclear about the job they are seeking. As an example, I received an email that read “Please think of me when you see an opening.” I had no clue of the work the individual was seeking, what location(s) he desired, or the organization(s) the person had in mind. The job seeker may have known all the answers to these questions but because it wasn’t clear to me, so I wasn’t able to help him.

2. Make it easy for your network- Don’t make your contacts guess, be clear in what you are seeking. Make a list of the titles you are interested in, your preferred organizations, and what location(s) you are willing to work in. You may also include a few of your accomplishments. Your network may not know of any current openings, but they may be able to introduce to people in your preferred organizations.

3. Write a simple email- One of the easiest ways to connect with your contacts is through a simple email. I recommend that that you personalize the beginning paragraph to each individual. The next paragraph can be devoted to explaining your situation and asking for help. An example is:

I am looking for a position in sales. I have recently received an award for being the top sales person at my company and would like to expand my role into management. My company currently does have a management position available, so I am looking at other options. I am keeping this job search confidential at this point but if you know of anyone at company x,y,z, I would welcome an introduction. I am seeking a role in inside sales at the manager level or above. I prefer to stay in the Treasure Valley area but I am open to travel. I appreciate your help. Please let me know if I can assist you in any way.

Contacting your network may be a bit awkward at first, but in the end, it could pay off with big rewards. Time and time again, I talk with people who have received a job offer directly as a result of a referral or an introduction. If you have been procrastinating on informing your network, I invite you to spend a few minutes to get the word out. It may be the most important email of your job search.

Stacy Harshman, founder of Your Fulfilling Life, brings her experience as a recruiter for a Fortune 500 corporation to her work as a career coach. In addition to helping people discover their passions, she also provides clients with insight into the mind of a recruiter, unlocking the secrets of what employers look for in potential employees. Stacy offers individual and group coaching in person and by phone to those seeking positive change in their professional lives.

Get your free audio of Four Essential Steps For A Successful Career Change on www.YourFulfillingLife.com

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 I am always curious to know how people have succeeded in their careers so I love to gather quotes from those who have achieved much. Below is the advice from successful people from many different walks of life, representing several different career paths.

Choosing your career

Steve Jobs definitely knew success. Walter Isaacson, his official biographer, described him as the “creative entrepreneur whose passion for perfection and ferocious drive revolutionized six industries: personal computers, animated movies, music, phones, tablet computing, and digital publishing.” With all of Job’s success, he never gave up on what he loved to do. He said “You’ve got to find what you love. And that is as true for your work as it is for your lovers. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on. So keep looking until you find it. Don’t settle.”

Adapting to Change

Ben Bernanke, the former Federal Reserve Chair reminds us to adapt to change quickly. He says “The history of technological innovation and economic development teaches us that change is the only constant. During your working lives, you will have to reinvent yourselves many times. Success and satisfaction will not come from mastering a fixed body of knowledge but from constant adaptation and creativity in a rapidly changing world. Engaging with and applying new technologies will be a crucial part of that adaptation.”

Overcoming failure

Sometimes we fear failure in our career but J.K. Rowling, author of the best-selling children’s book series Harry Potter, says that failure is to be expected. When talking to Matt Lauer on the Today show she said, “I don’t think we talk about failure enough. “It would’ve really helped to have someone who had had a measure of success come say to me, ‘You will fail. That’s inevitable. It’s what you do with it.”

Regularly Evaluating Your Career

Charlene Li, Founder Partner at Altimeter Group, said that a Harvard professor told her to evaluate her career about every 18 months. She went on to add, “It’s 18 months because that’s about how long it takes for a person to master a job — and begin to look for new challenges. Either you find those challenges in the existing job or you have to and find new opportunities. Regardless, that regular evaluation keeps you honest about managing your career, rather than passively going along with the situation that you are currently in.”

Look for opportunities

Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook, and best-selling author advises those hoping to advance in their career to consciously look for opportunities to contribute. She writes, “Increasingly, opportunities are not well defined but, instead, come from someone jumping in to do something. That something then becomes his job.”

Dealing with challenges

Challenges often discourage us and keep us from advancing. Author and CNBC host Suze Orman, advises to navigate around them. She says “A wise teacher from India shared this insight: The elephant keeps walking as the dogs keep barking,” The sad fact is that we all have to navigate our way around the dogs in our career: external critics, competitors, horrible bosses, or colleagues who undermine. Based on my experience, I would advise you to prepare for the yapping to increase along with your success.”

Do you have any quotes that have helped you in your career? If so, I invite to share them.

Stacy Harshman, founder of Your Fulfilling Life, brings her experience as a recruiter for a Fortune 500 corporation to her work as a career coach. In addition to helping people discover their passions, she also provides clients with insight into the mind of a recruiter, unlocking the secrets of what employers look for in potential employees. Stacy offers individual and group coaching in person and by phone to those seeking positive change in their professional lives.

Get your free audio of Four Essential Steps For A Successful Career Change on http://www.YourFulfillingLife.com

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Businessman offering for handshakeIf you were to ask recruiters the method they prefer to source candidates, what do you think the response would be? You may think of job fairs, company websites, or career sites like Indeed. All these options are used but, the number one preferred source is referrals. Nearly 74 percent of recruiters surveyed by Recruiting Trends said the best quality candidates came from employee referrals. Not only do the best come from referrals, they are also the number one source of new hires according to the CareerXroads 2014 Source of Hire report.

How do recruiters get referrals? Social media is a big player in the world of employee referrals. Gerry Cispin, principal and co-founder of CareerXroads, says “It’s hard to imagine that a social connection isn’t involved.” Recruiters work directly and indirectly with social media. Recruiters find candidates when employees share job postings on their personal social media sites such as LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook. Recruiters can also gather indirect referrals by tapping into the employees’ network of connections.

Why is this important? If you know what is important to a recruiter, you will know how to prioritize your job seeking activities. Since we know employee referrals are valuable to recruiters, you should spend considerable time building your network.

How do you get referred? You can begin by asking your network who they can introduce you to. You can also search social media sites yourself to find employees in your preferred organizations. The ideal is to meet the employee in person, but if not possible, you can ask to be connected on the employee’s social media of choice. If the employee posts an opening, you can apply and can ask to be referred. Even if no positions are posted, you may still be visible to a recruiter indirectly as part of the employee’s network of contacts.

Finding a job is tough, but it can be easier if you seek to be referred. I am reminded of a quote by Robert Kiyosaki that sums the concept up easily. He said “The richest people in the world look for and build networks. Everyone else looks for work.”

Stacy Harshman, founder of Your Fulfilling Life, brings her experience as a recruiter for a Fortune 500 corporation to her work as a career coach. In addition to helping people discover their passions, she also provides clients with insight into the mind of a recruiter, unlocking the secrets of what employers look for in potential employees. Stacy offers individual and group coaching in person and by phone to those seeking positive change in their professional lives.
Get your free audio of Four Essential Steps For A Successful Career Change on http://www.YourFulfillingLife.com

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miserable and sad young woman looking at her mobile phoneSocial media can be a wonderful tool in helping you land a job, but it can also jeopardize your employment. Below are mistakes that people have made that have cost them their jobs.

Posting your offer letter can have consequences- The News Journal in Wilmington, Delaware offered a job to a young reporter who had just graduated from a journalism program. He shared his excitement on his Tumblr blog using the company’s logo and quoting from the offer letter. The post took the form of an unauthorized press release. The Journal rescinded the offer saying that the reporter had illegally used the company logo and was not to quote from the offer letter.

Yes, a job offer is good news that you may want to share but be very careful how you share it on social media. Do not post the actual letter or quote from it. Also, do not include the company logo in your post. Above all, never give out confidential information about your new company.

Venting about customers/patients can get you fired- In my home state of Idaho, a nurse was fired for a complaint he posted on Facebook. Joseph Talbot, a licensed practical nurse, posted “Ever have one of those days where you’d like to slap the ever loving bat snot out a patient who is just being a jerk because they can? Nurses shouldn’t have to take abuse from you just because you are sick. In fact, it makes me less motivated to make sure your call light gets answered every time when I know that the minute I step into the room I’ll be greeted by a deluge of insults.”

Desert View Care Center, Talbot’s employer, had a social media policy stating that employees were to avoid slanderous, vulgar, obscene, intimidating, threatening, or other bullying behavior electronically towards any facility stakeholders. Because Talbot violated the policy, the Care Center fired him. Talbot filed a lawsuit when he was denied unemployment benefits. The Idaho Supreme Court upheld the Care Center’s decision and Talbot was deemed ineligible for unemployment. (Talbot v. Desert View Care Center, Idaho, No. 61 June 20, 2014).

Don’t assume your social media posts are private- Janis Roberts was a paramedic with CareFlite, a helicopter ambulance service. Roberts posted that she “wanted to slap” a patient who needed restraints during a transport. Her employer got wind of the post and asked her to take it down. Roberts responded by telling her company “Yeah whatever, a patient needs an attitude adjustment.” CareFlite then fired Roberts for her post and also for her insubordinate and unprofessional behavior. Roberts subsequently filed a lawsuit asserting CareFlite violated her privacy regarding her personal Facebook posts. The Texas Court of Appeals dismissed the lawsuit for lack of legal support. (Roberts v. CareFlight, Texas Court of Appeal 2d District, No. 02-12-00105-cv, Oct. 4 , 2012)

Be smart in your use of social media. Remember that posts can be discovered by your organization, so think how your employer would react before your post a comment. A little caution will go a long way in advancing your career.

Stacy Harshman, founder of Your Fulfilling Life, brings her experience as a recruiter for a Fortune 500 corporation to her work as a career coach. In addition to helping people discover their passions, she also provides clients with insight into the mind of a recruiter, unlocking the secrets of what employers look for in potential employees. Stacy offers individual and group coaching in person and by phone to those seeking positive change in their professional lives.

Get your free audio of Four Essential Steps For A Successful Career Change on www.YourFulfillingLife.com

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