Archive for Job Search

concentrated scowling young woman looking through magnifyierRecently, Jobvite, a recruiting intelligence platform, surveyed 1,404 recruiting and HR professionals from a range of industries on how talent is sourced and what current trends are being seen in the labor market. The survey, conducted in July 2015, reveals how recruiters find candidates, what stumbling blocks they encounter, what they notice most, and how they evaluate candidates. Additionally, the survey included advice on how to best utilize social media.

The top recruiting sources- Referrals still remain the #1 source of all hires at 78%. Social and professional networks represent 56% of hires and intern-to-hire programs come in at 55%. Although it is very tempting to spend the majority of your job search time applying for online positions, it is clear from this data that building relationships is a much more effective method to landing a job.

Stumbling Blocks- Internal bottlenecks appear to have a big impact on the time it takes to hire a candidate. Recruiters reported that the biggest challenge (49%) is the amount of time that a hiring manager takes to move a candidate through the recruiting process. The next biggest challenge (41%) is the time it takes for a hiring manager to review resumes. Salary negotiations hold up the process 19% of the time. Although recruiters are the ones that you most often interact with as an applicant, it appears that the hiring managers are the ones responsible for the extended process.

What recruiters notice most- The #1 thing that recruiters consider most on an online profile is the length of job tenure (74%) followed by the length of tenure with your current employer (57%). Other important considerations are mutual connections (34%), commitment to professional organizations (30%), and examples of written or design work (29%).

Evaluating Candidates- Most organizations still rely on resumes and in-person interviews to evaluate candidates. What really matters most is culture fit (88%), previous job experience (87%), and characteristics such as enthusiasm (87%), industry knowledge (85%), conversation skills (79%), punctuality (66%), and appearance (63%).

Advice for Social Media- A full 76% of recruiters recommend job seekers share details about volunteer, professional, or social engagement work. Spelling and grammar mistakes are noticed by 72% of respondents. Half of the recruiters (52%) suggest that you engage with current events appropriately. On the negative side, 75% view talking about marijuana use as inappropriate and 54% view alcohol use as a drawback. If you are looking for a job in communications or marketing, be sure to engage in social media because 33% of recruiters in this industry view limited engagement as a negative.

With social media, job search has become a little more complicated; however, it still boils down to the same basic principles- engage with your network, have patience in the process, and present yourself as an enthusiastic, well-informed individual.

Stacy Harshman, founder of Your Fulfilling Life, brings her experience as a recruiter for a Fortune 500 corporation to her work as a career coach. In addition to helping people discover their passions, she also provides clients with insight into the mind of a recruiter, unlocking the secrets of what employers look for in potential employees. Stacy offers individual and group coaching in person and by phone to those seeking positive change in their professional lives.

Get your free audio of Four Essential Steps For A Successful Career Change on http://www.YourFulfillingLife.com

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 The best job leads are likely to come from your network of connections; however, asking them for help can seem daunting. We often procrastinate about informing our network because it can be a bit awkward. Below are some ideas of how to talk with your contacts.

1. Know what you are looking for- Job seekers are often unclear about the job they are seeking. As an example, I received an email that read “Please think of me when you see an opening.” I had no clue of the work the individual was seeking, what location(s) he desired, or the organization(s) the person had in mind. The job seeker may have known all the answers to these questions but because it wasn’t clear to me, so I wasn’t able to help him.

2. Make it easy for your network- Don’t make your contacts guess, be clear in what you are seeking. Make a list of the titles you are interested in, your preferred organizations, and what location(s) you are willing to work in. You may also include a few of your accomplishments. Your network may not know of any current openings, but they may be able to introduce to people in your preferred organizations.

3. Write a simple email- One of the easiest ways to connect with your contacts is through a simple email. I recommend that that you personalize the beginning paragraph to each individual. The next paragraph can be devoted to explaining your situation and asking for help. An example is:

I am looking for a position in sales. I have recently received an award for being the top sales person at my company and would like to expand my role into management. My company currently does have a management position available, so I am looking at other options. I am keeping this job search confidential at this point but if you know of anyone at company x,y,z, I would welcome an introduction. I am seeking a role in inside sales at the manager level or above. I prefer to stay in the Treasure Valley area but I am open to travel. I appreciate your help. Please let me know if I can assist you in any way.

Contacting your network may be a bit awkward at first, but in the end, it could pay off with big rewards. Time and time again, I talk with people who have received a job offer directly as a result of a referral or an introduction. If you have been procrastinating on informing your network, I invite you to spend a few minutes to get the word out. It may be the most important email of your job search.

Stacy Harshman, founder of Your Fulfilling Life, brings her experience as a recruiter for a Fortune 500 corporation to her work as a career coach. In addition to helping people discover their passions, she also provides clients with insight into the mind of a recruiter, unlocking the secrets of what employers look for in potential employees. Stacy offers individual and group coaching in person and by phone to those seeking positive change in their professional lives.

Get your free audio of Four Essential Steps For A Successful Career Change on www.YourFulfillingLife.com

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