Archive for Career Changes

Job interviewEver heard the word “returnship”? Returnship is an internship opportunity geared towards experienced professionals. The concept was coined by Goldman Sachs back in 2008 to help people restart their careers after an extended absence from the workforce. Goldman began a program to offer a paid, ten-week program for professionals to experience working again and at the end, offered full-time jobs to those selected. This program is still in existence and as a result, other companies such as Capital One, have followed its lead.

What are the benefits? A returnship is a way to transition back into the workplace. According to Goldman Sach’s website: “Whether it leads to a full-time career, or serves to sharpen the skills necessary to take the next step, the Goldman Sachs Returnship Program is a valuable experience for anyone who’s ready to re-enter the workforce.” Stacey Delo, founder and CEO of Maybrooks, a career resource for mothers says “a returnship is a great way to get some experience and leverage that into a job”.

What are the risks involved? A returnship may sound like a great option but there are definitely drawbacks you must consider. Stacey Hawley, a published author, and career counselor, advises you not to try it. She writes “A returnship is NOT an internship. And individuals pursuing a returnship are VERY different than individuals pursuing an internship. Interns are usually college students who only WANT to work for 10 weeks. Individuals who are considering a returnship really want to work full time. “ Hawley also reveals that Goldman Sachs hires only 50% of its returnship participants. She warns “if you aren’t hired full-time after the trial period is over, you need to start all over again. And explain to a new employer why you weren’t offered a full-time job.”

If you are considering a returnship, think about the benefits vs. rewards. You may be able to land a full time position at the organization; but it is probably a 50-50 chance. You will likely be able to add some skills to your resume but you could also accomplish that by working for a temporary staffing firm. Also, not all companies pay their returnship participates so evaluate if the experience is worth giving up your pay and time lost in job search activities. Overall, although a returnship may be wonderful for some participants, it is most likely not the best option for the majority of job seekers.

Stacy Harshman, founder of Your Fulfilling Life, brings her experience as a recruiter for a Fortune 500 corporation to her work as a career coach. In addition to helping people discover their passions, she also provides clients with insight into the mind of a recruiter, unlocking the secrets of what employers look for in potential employees. Stacy offers individual and group coaching in person and by phone to those seeking positive change in their professional lives.
Get your free audio of Four Essential Steps For A Successful Career Change on www.YourFulfillingLife.com

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tablet pcThe healthcare industry is on track to create 5.6 million new jobs by 2020, according to a study from Georgetown University’s Center on Education and Workforce. Healthcare is now responsible for one in nine jobs in the U.S. according to the Labor Department. In addition to traditional doctors and nurses, there will also be demand for other positions that support the healthcare industry.

Not all healthcare jobs require degrees- Below are healthcare positions that may require education such as certification, but do not require a degree.

Medical Records and Health Information Technicians- Processes, maintains, compiles, and reports patient information for health requirements and standards. Median salary- $17.26 hourly, $35,900 annual

Medical Secretary- Duties may include scheduling appointments, billing patients, and compiling and recording medical charts, reports, and correspondence. Median salary- $15.50 hourly, $32,240 annual

Phlebotomist- Draws blood for tests, transfusions, donations, or research. Median salary- $14.74 hourly, $30,670 annual

Medical assistant- Performs duties assisting a physician such as taking and recording vital signs and medical histories, preparing patients for examination, drawing blood, and administering medications. Median salary- $14.41 hourly, $29,960 annual

Pharmacy Technician- Prepares medications under the direction of a pharmacist. Median salary- $14.33 hourly, $29,810 annual

Nursing assistant- Provides basic patient care such as feeding, bathing, dressing, grooming, or moving patients, or changing linens. Median salary- $12.07 hourly, $25,100 annual

Home health and hospice aides- Provides routine individualized healthcare such as changing bandages and dressing wounds, at the patient’s home or in a care facility. Median wage- $10.28 hourly, $21,380 annual

A job in healthcare can be rewarding. As the ancient Roman philosopher Cicero said, “In nothing do men more nearly approach the gods than in giving health to men.

Stacy Harshman, founder of Your Fulfilling Life, brings her experience as a recruiter for a Fortune 500 corporation to her work as a career coach. In addition to helping people discover their passions, she also provides clients with insight into the mind of a recruiter, unlocking the secrets of what employers look for in potential employees. Stacy offers individual and group coaching in person and by phone to those seeking positive change in their professional lives.
Get your free audio of Four Essential Steps For A Successful Career Change on http://www.YourFulfillinglife.com

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 Ever wished you could reinvent your life or your career? Apparently this desire is quite common. Social psychologist Richard Luker says that “adults are saying not only do I see a more vigorous life, I’m up for it, I’m game, I want to do more. Our research is bearing that out in spades”. Jane Pauley in her book Your Life Calling: Reimagining the Rest of Your Life, states “Today men and women in their forties can reasonably be thinking about beginning a new career or something new that’s not a career. We are the first generation to get a heads-up that not only is there more to come, but may even the best of all.”

Put up your periscope– Knowing where to begin to reinvent your career is challenging to say the least. For her book, Pauley interviewed Tripp Hanson who reinvented his career from being a Broadway performer to becoming an acupuncturist. Hanson was 42 when he began to question what his next career move would be. He says “Forty did not feel like thirty at the end of the show. More ice, more heat, more Advil”. Hanson sought out a therapist who advised him to “Put up your periscope. Just look around, over the fence, over the hedge, check it out. Things are going to grab your attention; pay attention when they do. When something intrigues you, pay attention. Why does that matter so much to you? Go a little further. Take another step. Listen to that small, quiet voice.“

Tripp Hanson did indeed ‘put up his periscope.’ He became intrigued with acupuncture after taking his dog Spanky, for knee problems. When Spanky could walk down stairs within 2 visits, Hanson decided to also try acupuncture for his own injuries. He too experienced immediate results. He found that acupuncture not only intrigued him, but it was also a re-awakening of a childhood dream of becoming a doctor.

The first step- Reinventing your career is often a long process, but the first step can be straight forward. It can be as simple as noticing what captures your interest. If you enjoy journaling, you can begin by writing about the things you would enjoy learning more about. If you are not a writer, consider taking photos of scenes that draw you in. Yet another idea is to create a Pinterest board of things you like best. It doesn’t matter what method you use, the important thing is that you notice and take note of what intrigues you.

If you are thinking there is something more for you to do, you are on the right track. Jane Pauley concludes her book by saying “Inspiration is everywhere, but you have to be looking.” I would also add ‘you also need to be listening to hear that small quiet voice of inner wisdom.’

Stacy Harshman, founder of Your Fulfilling Life, brings her experience as a recruiter for a Fortune 500 corporation to her work as a career coach. In addition to helping people discover their passions, she also provides clients with insight into the mind of a recruiter, unlocking the secrets of what employers look for in potential employees. Stacy offers individual and group coaching in person and by phone to those seeking positive change in their professional lives.

Get your free audio of Four Essential Steps For A Successful Career Change on http://www.YourFulfillingLife.com

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young businessman in front of a crossroadMost people assume if you want to change careers, you should start by deciding what your new profession will be, but that is not the first step according to Harvard business school professor Herminia Ibarra. She writes, “By far the biggest mistake people make when trying to change careers is to delay taking the first step until they have settled on a destination.” In other words, not knowing the end result should not be a barrier to action.

Change makes ready- Ibarra encourages people to start the change process before they have all the answers worked out. “What people get wrong about reinvention is that they think they have to be ready. Instead change makes ready”. In short, seeing small changes prepares us for even bigger changes to occur.

Do first, know later– To change careers, you must step out of your comfort zone and begin doing something. It is like learning a new game. You wouldn’t say, “I have to know exactly what the end result will be before I begin”. You simply start with the first step and learn as you go.

If you are thinking about changing careers, don’t delay. Take a first step. Change makes ready. As author Job Sabah says “You don’t have to be great to start, but you have to start to be great.”

Stacy Harshman, founder of Your Fulfilling Life, brings her experience as a recruiter for a Fortune 500 corporation to her work as a career coach. In addition to helping people discover their passions, she also provides clients with insight into the mind of a recruiter, unlocking the secrets of what employers look for in potential employees. Stacy offers individual and group coaching in person and by phone to those seeking positive change in their professional lives.
Get your free audio of Four Essential Steps For A Successful Career Change on http://www.YourFulfillingLife.com

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Jul
27

Career Advice From High Acheivers

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 I am always curious to know how people have succeeded in their careers so I love to gather quotes from those who have achieved much. Below is the advice from successful people from many different walks of life, representing several different career paths.

Choosing your career

Steve Jobs definitely knew success. Walter Isaacson, his official biographer, described him as the “creative entrepreneur whose passion for perfection and ferocious drive revolutionized six industries: personal computers, animated movies, music, phones, tablet computing, and digital publishing.” With all of Job’s success, he never gave up on what he loved to do. He said “You’ve got to find what you love. And that is as true for your work as it is for your lovers. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on. So keep looking until you find it. Don’t settle.”

Adapting to Change

Ben Bernanke, the former Federal Reserve Chair reminds us to adapt to change quickly. He says “The history of technological innovation and economic development teaches us that change is the only constant. During your working lives, you will have to reinvent yourselves many times. Success and satisfaction will not come from mastering a fixed body of knowledge but from constant adaptation and creativity in a rapidly changing world. Engaging with and applying new technologies will be a crucial part of that adaptation.”

Overcoming failure

Sometimes we fear failure in our career but J.K. Rowling, author of the best-selling children’s book series Harry Potter, says that failure is to be expected. When talking to Matt Lauer on the Today show she said, “I don’t think we talk about failure enough. “It would’ve really helped to have someone who had had a measure of success come say to me, ‘You will fail. That’s inevitable. It’s what you do with it.”

Regularly Evaluating Your Career

Charlene Li, Founder Partner at Altimeter Group, said that a Harvard professor told her to evaluate her career about every 18 months. She went on to add, “It’s 18 months because that’s about how long it takes for a person to master a job — and begin to look for new challenges. Either you find those challenges in the existing job or you have to and find new opportunities. Regardless, that regular evaluation keeps you honest about managing your career, rather than passively going along with the situation that you are currently in.”

Look for opportunities

Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook, and best-selling author advises those hoping to advance in their career to consciously look for opportunities to contribute. She writes, “Increasingly, opportunities are not well defined but, instead, come from someone jumping in to do something. That something then becomes his job.”

Dealing with challenges

Challenges often discourage us and keep us from advancing. Author and CNBC host Suze Orman, advises to navigate around them. She says “A wise teacher from India shared this insight: The elephant keeps walking as the dogs keep barking,” The sad fact is that we all have to navigate our way around the dogs in our career: external critics, competitors, horrible bosses, or colleagues who undermine. Based on my experience, I would advise you to prepare for the yapping to increase along with your success.”

Do you have any quotes that have helped you in your career? If so, I invite to share them.

Stacy Harshman, founder of Your Fulfilling Life, brings her experience as a recruiter for a Fortune 500 corporation to her work as a career coach. In addition to helping people discover their passions, she also provides clients with insight into the mind of a recruiter, unlocking the secrets of what employers look for in potential employees. Stacy offers individual and group coaching in person and by phone to those seeking positive change in their professional lives.

Get your free audio of Four Essential Steps For A Successful Career Change on http://www.YourFulfillingLife.com

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Aug
25

The Seems Too-Good-To-Be-True Career

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Celebrating businesswoman jumpingIf you saw an ad for a job that was in high demand, offered great salary, and no degree required, would you think it was a scam? I would question it; however, there is a profession that fits all these criteria. Computer programming.

Demand-Companies are desperate for programmers. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts there will be one million unfilled programming jobs by 2020. Currently there is more demand than supply of people who can program which makes the profession very appealing

Salary potential-The U.S. Department of Labor/Employment & Training Administration report that the median wage for programmers in 2013 was $76,140. US News and World Report found the best-paid 10 percent in the field made approximately $117,890, while the bottom 10 percent made approximately $42,850.

Education Requirements– Isn’t a programming degree required? Not necessarily. According to a recent Wall Street Journal article, (http://online.wsj.com/articles/computer-programming-is-a-trade-lets-act-like-it-1407109947) 14% of the members of some teams at Google don’t have a degree, and 67% of programming jobs are in non-tech companies where other experience is more likely to be valued.

Coding Schools- Coding schools are opening to offer students intensive training in a short amount of time. A school in Seattle, Code Fellows, offers 4 week classes for novice developers and intensive 8 week classes for the more experienced. The school is so confident that its graduates will have jobs, they guarantee a job within 9 months paying at least $60,000 or the tuition is reimbursed. Some schools offer free programming classes online. New York based Codecademy offers students classes in areas such as HTML, JavaScript, and Python. Code School is another online option. It uses gaming mechanics to make learning more like playing a game. The cost is only $29.00 a month. Treehouse, another school, offers online courses for $25.00 a month and more workshops and interviews from industry professionals at $49.00 a month.

Options for career changers- Coding may be something that you have never considered, but it is worth thinking over. The barrier to entry is relatively low. The Wall Street Journal is now calling programming a trade- something that a person can develop at least a basic proficiency within weeks or months. It may sounds too good to be true, but the reality is programming is a career with a bright future.

Stacy Harshman, founder of Your Fulfilling Life, brings her experience as a recruiter for a Fortune 500 corporation to her work as a career coach. In addition to helping people discover their passions, she also provides clients with insight into the mind of a recruiter, unlocking the secrets of what employers look for in potential employees. Stacy offers individual and group coaching in person and by phone to those seeking positive change in their professional lives.
Get your free audio of Four Essential Steps For A Successful Career Change on www.YourFulfillingLife.com

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A portfolio career is a relatively new term so you may not be familiar with it. In general, it refers to income being generated from more than one source.  For example, a person may work doing several things such as part-time employment, temporary work, freelance assignments or personal business.  It may also be that a person works a full-time job while also generating income from another venture.  According to Penelope Trunk, the co-founder of Brazen Careerist, “a portfolio career is not the same thing as holding down three bad jobs and wishing you could figure out what to do with yourself.  Rather, it is a scheme you pursue purposefully and positively, as a way to achieve financial or personal goals or a mixture of both.”

What are the advantages of a portfolio career?   On advantage is that you can try out different careers at the same time.  If you don’t know if you enjoy a particular job, having a portfolio career allows you “test drive” a little at a time.  Another advantage is that a portfolio career also allows for more variety and creativity in your life.  A common complaint from people is that they get bored in their jobs but if you are doing more than one job, you are much less likely to get tired of the same old thing.  Yet another plus is that by working more than one job, you don’t have all of your eggs in the same basket.  If you get laid off from one job, you still have at least one other to fall back on.

What are the disadvantages of a portfolio career?  One disadvantage that you will have to consider is benefits.  Many organizations do not offer benefits if you are part time.  You may have to purchase insurance for yourself which is likely to be more expensive than being on an employer’s plan.  Another disadvantage is the time that it takes to do more than one job.  Are you comfortable working odd hours or when everyone else is off enjoying their weekend?  Yet another minus is managing your time and energy to be able to juggle and accomplish many tasks at the same time.

A portfolio career may be a great option for your career; but, it requires much planning.  If you are thinking about the possibilities for your life’s work, I am happy to help you through the process.

Your Fulfilling Life Career Coaching was founded to assist individuals experiencing career transitions. Whether you have just been laid off or you don’t know “what you want to do when you grow up”, career coaching can help you move through the process successfully. Contact me for more information at Stacy@YourFulfillingLife.com.

 

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